Friday, December 26, 2008

Are You My Mother? - Children's book by P.D. Eastman

Oddly enough, this book, Are You My Mother?, was one of my all-time favorites as a preschooler. I had not thought about the story in years, but it crossed my mind during the long drive home from visiting my maternal family. After going through my own search for my biological father and wondering with each response whether I'd finally found him, I realized the uncanny similiarities between it and my own life. Below is the description.

A mother bird is sitting on her egg in her nest. Suddenly the egg jumps, and mother bird realizes that her baby is about to break out of its egg and will be hungry. Away she flies for food. While the mother bird is gone, the baby bird comes out of its shell. The first thing he says is, "Where is my mother?" He starts looking for her but doesn’t see her in the nest. The baby bird wants to find his mother, but forgets that he can’t fly. He falls down, way down out the nest. He starts to walk to find his mother. He doesn’t know what his mother looks like, so he walks right by her. He comes upon a kitten, a hen, a dog, and a cow. The baby bird asks all of them the same question, "Are you my mother?" They all reply no. Before he continues his search, he stops to wonder if he really does have a mother. He is positive he does, so he goes on. Next he comes upon other things, an old car, a boat, and a plane and asks if any of them could be his mother. He gets no reply, so on he goes. The last thing he meets up with, is a great big excavator. He is so sure this is his mother. Finally he has found her! He runs excitedly up to it, climbs on and says, "Mother Mother, here I am mother!" The excavator says to the baby bird, "SNORT". Quickly the baby bird realizes he has made a mistake. This is definitely not his mother. The excavator begins to move and the baby bird is in big trouble now. He cries out, "I want to go home, I want my mother!" The excavator puts the baby bird gently back in his nest and his mother comes home. She asks him if he knows who she is. After the baby bird tells his mother of all the adventures he had looking for her, he says, "You are bird, and you are my mother." This is a terrific book for little ones age 18 months and up.

3 comments:

ZombieFoodie said...

ARE YOU MY MOTHER? is one of my kids' favorite books (mine, too from childhood). Anyway, my 2 yo found an copy of Stuart Little and wanted me to read the BIIIIG book to her. We didn't make it past the first couple of chapters, but they were about the difficulties of Stuart had fitting into the Little family. It just reads very differently to me these days.

missinpiece said...

I like this book too. Thanks for linking to my blog. The connection between anonymous sperm donation and closed adoptions are strong and to me, it makes complete sense for us to share knowledge, resources, experiences in the struggle to find our identities. I don't think I will ever feel really at peace with myself until I know something of who my biological parents are/were. Good luck with your search - it is great that you have understanding family - and your work: it is important!

Kathleen R. LaBounty - KathleenRuby@aol.com said...

Thanks for the comments!

ZombieFoodie - I've never read Stuart Little, but it sounds like I should take a look at it. It really is amazing how certain books, movies, etc. have the ability to affect us differently after various life experiences.

Missingpiece - I hope you find what you're looking for as well! I think you're right that donor-conceived and adoptees need to work together. We have a lot of similarities.